Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved by Jonathan S. Watts & Yoshiharu Tomatsu

August 26, 2014 Death Awareness

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Buddhist CareBuddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved
by Jonathan S. Watts  & Yoshiharu Tomatsu

“A valuable and amazing resource! This collection is a ‘must’ for those of us involved in chaplaincy care.”—Pat Enkyo O’Hara, Guiding Teacher, New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care

Since its beginning, Buddhism has been intimately concerned with confronting and understanding death and dying. Indeed, the tradition emphasizes turning toward the realities of sickness, old age, and death—and using those very experiences to develop wisdom and liberating compassion. In recent decades, Buddhist chaplains and caregivers all over the world have been drawing on this tradition to contribute greatly to the development of modern palliative and hospice care in the secular world at large. Specifically Buddhist hospice programs have been further developing and applying traditional Buddhist practices of preparing for death, attending the dying, and comforting the bereaved.

Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved contains comprehensive overviews of the best of such initiatives, drawn from diverse Buddhist traditions, and written by practitioners who embody the best of contemporary Buddhist hospice care programs practiced all over the world today.

Contributors include Carl B. Becker, Moichiro Hayashi, Yozo Taniyama, Mari Sengoku, Phaisan Visalo, Beth Kanji Goldring, Caroline Prasada Brazier, Joan Jiko Halifax, and Julie Chijo Hanada.

Praise

“Watts and Tomatsu provide an unprecedented look into modern Buddhist practices of caring for the dying and bereaved. This book is an indispensable field manual for contemplative caregivers, and a must-read for anyone drawn to end-of-life care.”—Willa B. Miller and Cheryl A. Giles, coeditors of The Arts of Contemplative Care

“A wonderful contribution to the emerging discussion on how to develop spiritual, compassionate support for the dying in our society.”—Anyen Rinpoche, author of Journey to Certainty and Dying With Confidence

“These authors intelligently ask how Buddhists worldwide, right now, are helping with dying, and find that there are so many ways. They also show how we can do a better job, individually, collectively, and institutionally. This book is a treasure-trove—we will most definitely use it in classes.”—Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown, Ph.D., Professor, Naropa University Buddhist Chaplaincy program

Jonathan S. Watts graduated with a BA in religious studies from Princeton University in 1989 and an MA in human sciences from the Saybrook Institute in 2002. He has been a researcher at the Jodo Shu Research Institute in Tokyo since 1999 and the International Buddhist Exchange Center since 2005. He has also been an associate professor of Buddhist studies at Keio University, Tokyo, and has been on the executive board of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists (INEB) since 2003. He has coauthored and edited Never Die Alone: Birth as Death in Pure Land Buddhism;Rethinking Karma: The Dharma of Social Justice; and This Precious Life: Buddhist Tsunami Relief, and Anti-Nuclear Activism in Post 3/11 Japan.
Rev. Yoshiharu Tomatsu became a fully ordained Buddhist priest in 1978. As a temple abbot, he has presided over thousands of funerals and memorial services while attending to spiritual needs of lay people. He received his masters of divinity at Taisho University, Tokyo, in 1979 and his master’s of theological studies at Harvard University Divinity School in 1991. Rev. Tomatsu has been the coordinator of Jodo Shu Research Institute Study Group on Bio-Ethics since 2000, an associate professor at Keio University School of Medicine since 2005, and the founder and director of Jodo Shu Research Institute Ojo and Death Project since 2005. Tomatsu is the co-editor, with Jonathan Watts, of Never Die Alone: Birth as Death in Pure Land Buddhism and Traversing the Pure Land Path: A Lifetime of Encounters with Honen Shonin.
Disclaimer: Use of the information and data is to bring awareness of death and dying. Spirare does not own the information or profit from its use. Source & Photo : Wisdom Publications

Words of Inspiration

"I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it."
Mark Twain
“They say that a part of you dies when a special Loved One passes away...I disagree...I say a part of you lives with your Loved One on the other side.”
Daniel Yanez

Death Awareness

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Please Help spread awareness.

“The fear of death comes from limited awareness.”   Deepak Chopra

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